BUTTERWORTH LOW PASS FILTER. PASS FILTER


Butterworth low pass filter. Dust cartridge filters. Fram oil filter chart.



Butterworth Low Pass Filter





butterworth low pass filter






    pass filter
  • A band-pass filter is a device that passes frequencies within a certain range and rejects (attenuates) frequencies outside that range. An example of an analogue electronic band-pass filter is an RLC circuit (a resistor–inductor–capacitor circuit).





    butterworth
  • a washing process used to gas free or clean a cargo tank, employing hot water or chemicals, sprayed through a patented rotating nozzle.  back

  • Butterworth was a township occupying the southeastern part of the parish of Rochdale, in the hundred of Salford, Lancashire, England. The centre of Butterworth was east of the market town of Rochdale

  • Best in-band amplitude flatness, lower stopband attenuation than Chebyshev, better than Chebyshev for group delay flatness and overshoot (usually used as a compromise). All of the above are realizable in parallel-coupled, direct-coupled, and interdigital filter topologies.





    low
  • A low point, level or figure

  • A particularly bad or difficult moment

  • A state of depression or low spirits

  • in a low position; near the ground; "the branches hung low"

  • less than normal in degree or intensity or amount; "low prices"; "the reservoir is low"

  • an air mass of lower pressure; often brings precipitation; "a low moved in over night bringing sleet and snow"











The Law of Tort - 2nd edition. General editor: Ken Oliphant. Butterworths Common Law Series




The Law of Tort - 2nd edition. General editor: Ken Oliphant. Butterworths Common Law Series





THESE ARE GREAT TORT SIGNPOSTS TO ASSIST THE COMMON LAW SERIES.

A review by Phillip Taylor MBE. Richmond Green Chambers.

Ken Oliphant has brought together his excellent team of ten for the common law title ‘Tort’, or ‘Torts’ as some prefer it, as the second in this series from Butterworths which sets a very high standard throughout its 1700 pages.

The work provides an in-depth analysis of the modern law of torts set out in 30 chapters with a user-friendly index and rather a lot of footnotes which is to be expected when identifying principles derived from judicial decisions and legislation where you must have the detail. Under Oliphant’s guidance the team has produced a worthy rival for its heavyweight competitors with each bringing its own gifts to the practitioner, judge, academic lawyer and student. So what makes this work different?

THE RIGHT SIGNPOSTS

The style is different and very much a trademark of the Butterworths stable of books to start with, and what I would expect from Butterworths. It provides a clear and authoritative exposition of the existing law with each chapter very much the domain of the individual distinguished contributor.

The section headings are well chosen signposts as Sir Malcolm Pill describes them in his original Foreword, and both practitioners and students will benefit from the further thought and study suggestions contained here. I welcome, particularly, the sorts of issues which are likely to be raised by a set of facts which may be given to me by my client, and I now know where to look for possible solutions set out clearly and logically as great guidance.

I am glad Andrew Grubb clarifies these principles as ‘Torts Law’ for that is what it is within the common law as a series of civil responsibilities which go with rights. The waffling word ‘obligations’, which is the current favourite term to define ‘tort’ as a compartment, is something Oliphant tries valiantly to do on page one, as just about every writer has done in the past, and he makes a very good go at it.

I have always enjoyed the argument about whether we have ‘tortious liability’ favoured by ‘you know who’ and his other judicially unorthodox brothers of the recent past who were keen on creating certain types of equity to get the right judicial answer, or ‘specific torts’.

I think the ‘torts’ have it at the moment but who knows what might happen during the twenty-first century with the internet revolution and digitalisation. Let’s just say it is a civil liability and use the rights/responsibilities concept and reasonableness rather than the Euro word ‘proportionate’ which translates better (apparently).

THE JUDICIAL LINK

This book is also useful for judges as it gives a degree of guidance on what the accepted view of the law is whilst thinking about a reformulation or change in the direction of the law deemed appropriate to its time – what Denning actually tried to do. So, if you are in court look around for the Butterworths series and you will know where his lordship is coming from!

THE SERIES DIRECTION

Grubb, as series editor, succeeds with his stated legal direction for these great literary contributions to the modern statements of law from Butterworths, who are the natural historic leaders with Halsbury. Oliphant and his team have produced great assistance on understanding torts so that the law itself is “less likely to be left undeveloped ‘marching…in the rear limping a little’” which Grubb quotes from a famous judicial aphorism by Windeyer J in Mount Isa Mines v Pusey.

The signposts are up with this common law series, and practitioners can take the direction they want for their own practice- mine is clearly this signposted direction with its welcome contribution to the literature and the understanding of the law of torts- it has helped and encouraged me to identify potential developments in the law, and advice to clients, and I thank the distinguished contributors for sharing their knowledge and views with people like me who practice and teach the subject to the public.

LexisNexis Butterworths Series Editor: Andrew Grubb

ISBN: 978-1-4057-1240-8













Butterworth, Deal visit 2011 Manufacture of the Year




Butterworth, Deal visit 2011 Manufacture of the Year





ROCKMART, Ga., Oct. 5, 2011 – Major Gen. Jim Butterworth, Georgia’s Adjutant General, traveled today to this Northwest Georgia city with Gov. Nathan Deal and Chris Cumminskey, commissioner of the Georgia Department of Economic Development, to congratulate the employees at Meggitt Polymer and Composites for being named the 2011 Large Manufacturer of the Year by the Technical College System of Georgia and the Georgia Department of Economic Development.

Here, from the left, Butterworth, Deal and Cumminskie listen as Meggitt’s deputy president John Skubina explains how plant technicians use molds like this one for the engine intake of a Sikorsky CH-53 helicopter to make parts for that aircraft and many others during a tour of the company’s facilities.

Meggitt Polymer and Composites designs and develops aircraft seals, flexible fuel tanks and coatings, complex composite structures, smart ice protection systems and sub-assemblies, and interior panels and accessories for several civil and military, fixed and rotary wing aircraft, and military vehicles. Among them are the UH-72A Lakota, the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter and the Humvee, all of which are used by the Georgia Army and Air Guard. According to company officials, Meggitt also has a large number of Georgia Guardsmen and Reservists among its more than 1,000 employees.

“On behalf of our more than 14,000 Citizen-Soldiers and Airman, it’s my pleasure to be here to honor this great group of men and women,” Butterworth said. “It’s because of their commitment to quality that we in the Guard, and all the services, are able to do our jobs, confident that the equipment we operate is the among the best in the world.”

During his address to his fellow employees, Skubina said Meggitt has always understood the importance of what the Guard does, and it is that understanding that continually drives the company toward the highest standards of quality.

“We appreciate what the National Guard and all the services do for us,” Skubina said. “As we continue to stand behind each and every product we manufacture, we will continue to stand behind those among us who leave our ranks to join yours when ever they get the call, however long they may be called to serve.”

(Georgia Department of Defense photo by Sgt. 1st Class Roy Henry)









butterworth low pass filter







See also:

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cpap hepa filter

atman aquarium filter

oil and oil filter change

high rate sand filter

application of high pass filter

ms spam filter

aqua pure filter cartridge



24
2011

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